CALDECOTT WINNER 2008 The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick

                  

 

 

CALDECOTT WINNER 1996 Officer Buckle and Gloria by Peggy Rathman

                    

                    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CALDECOTT WINNER 1976 Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People's Ears by Verna Aardema, illustrated by Leo and Diane Dillon

                     

 

CALDECOTT WINNER 1971 A Story A Story by Gail E. Haley

                 

 

                     

 

 

 

 

CALDECOTT WINNER 1963 The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats

                   

 

 

CALDECOTT WINNER 1957 A Tree is Nice by Janice Udry, illustrated by Marc Simont

                    

 

 

 

 

 

CALDECOTT HONOR BOOK 1994 Owen by Kevin Henkes

                   

 

CALDECOTT HONOR BOOK 1968 Frederick by Leo Lionni

                  

 

All book summary’s from www.goodreads.com

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Book Summary: Orphan, clock keeper, and thief, Hugo lives in the walls of a busy Paris train station, where his survival depends on secrets and anonymity. But when his world suddenly interlocks with an eccentric, bookish girl and a bitter old man who runs a toy booth in the station, Hugo's undercover life, and his most precious secret, are put in jeopardy. A cryptic drawing, a treasured notebook, a stolen key, a mechanical man, and a hidden message from Hugo's dead father form the backbone of this intricate, tender, and spellbinding mystery.

Book SummaryBesides the beguiling story, the affable illustrations of the smiling Gloria, the accidental mayhem in the background, and the myriad safety tips -- such as 'always pull the toothpick out of your sandwhich' and 'never lick a stop sign in the winter' -- add to the enjoyment. A glorious picture book.

Book Summary: "In this Caldecott Medal winner, Mosquito tells a story that causes a jungle disaster. "Elegance has become the Dillons' hallmark. . . . Matching the art is Aardema's uniquely onomatopoeic text . . . An impressive showpiece."                   

Book SummaryOnce, all the stories in the world belonged to Nyame, the Sky God. He kept them in a box beside his throne. But Ananse, the Spider man, wanted them -- and caught three sly creatures to get them. This story of how we got our own stories to tell is adapted from an African folktale.

Book Summary: "Trees are very nice," says Janice May Udry in her first book for children. She goes on to explain that even one tree is nice, if it is the only one you happen to have.  Some of the reasons why trees are so good to have around are funny. Some are indisputable facts. But in all of them there is a sense of poetic simplicity and beauty which will be sure to entrance any young child. Whether he knows one tree or many, he will relish the descriptions of the delights to be had in, with, or under a tree.

 

Marc Simont's joyous pictures, half of them in full color, accentuate the child-like charm of the words. And each painting of a tree or trees shows just how very nice they can be.

Book Summary: No book has captured the magic and sense of possibility of the first snowfall better than The Snowy Day. Universal in its appeal, the story has become a favorite of millions, as it reveals a child's wonder at a new world, and the hope of capturing and keeping that wonder forever.

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Book Summary: Owen’s fuzzy yellow blanket is his favorite possession. Everywhere Owen goes, his blanket goes with him. Upstairs, downstairs, in-between. Inside, outside, upside down. Everywhere! Owen’s parents are in despair—soon Owen will begin school, and he can’t take Fuzzy with him then. Whatever can be done?  This Caldecott Honor Book will provide reassurance and laughs whether shared at home or during circle time. Every child uses some sort of security object, whether it’s a toy, a thumb, or a binky. For those not yet ready to let go and for those who have moved on, here’s a story about making compromises that speaks to us all.

Book Summary: While other mice are gathering food for the winter, Frederick seems to daydream the summer away. When dreary winter comes, it is Frederick the poet-mouse who warms his friends and cheers them with his words

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